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Cherry Tree 'Kordia' - 9L Pot

Code: TR0111
Cherry Tree 'Kordia' - 9L Pot
These dark maroon fruits are very sweet and juicy, and ready to harvest in early mid-summer. Best if grown fan trained, so they can be netted to avoid bird damage, these trees grow in most moist, well-drained soil. It's a versatile, low-maintenance tree, which needs little attention once in place and trained to the correct shape.

Characteristics

  • Flower Colour: white
  • Foliage Colour: green
  • Approx. Growth Height: 4m
  • Rootstock: Colt - Semi-Dwarfing
  • Comes in a: 9L polypot (not a rigid pot)
  • Approx. Height on Arrival: 150-170cm
  • Tree is approx 3 years old with a 1 year old rootstock
  • Flowering Period: spring (April - May)
  • Harvesting Period: October
  • Season of Use: October - January
  • Growing Habit: bush, cordon, espalier, fan
  • Uses: eating fresh, cooking, liqueurs
  • Hardiness: fully hardy
  • Exposure: exposed, sheltered
  • Self pollinating: yes - (see 'Pollination' section below)
  • Rate of Growth: fast
  • Scented: barely
  • Wildlife friendly - attracts bees and other pollinating insects

Requirements

  • Light Requirements: full sun
  • Soil Requirements: neutral, clay, loam, sand
  • Moisture: moist, well-drained, moderately fertile

Caring and Maintenance

Water young trees regularly until roots are well established. Trim annually from mid to late summer. Apply some fertilizer in spring in order to promote healthy growth and a good crop. Optionally, mulch in spring. Check tree ties regularly and loosen any if necessary to avoid rubbing of the stems.

Planting

  • Planting Distance: 6m with 4.5m between rows

Suited to almost all well-drained and moderately fertile soils with pH between 6.5 and 7.5 in an exposed or sheltered location in full sun.
Before planting your tree, clean up all wandering weeds and keep a clean ring around the tree base. Water well during the first year until well established.

Autumn is the best season for planting fruiting trees, as the soil moisture and heat allow easier and faster root establishment and regeneration of damaged root systems.

Pollination:

  • Pollination Group: 4 (self pollinating)

Fruit trees will only produce fruit if their flowers have been pollinated. This is usually done by flying insects such as honey bees, bumblebees, flies, wasps etc. This tree is self-pollinating; it produces compatible flowers that can pollinate each other. However, even self-fertile varieties tend to crop better when another cultivar is planted nearby for pollination. Although this is not necessary to produce fruit, it will offer improved crops. The two trees will have to be near each other for the pollination process to be successful. The general consensus is that the two trees should be within 18m (55ft) of each other. To make things a bit easier fruit trees are categorised into different pollination groups. Just remember that the fruit must be of the same species but of a different variety; only an apple tree can pollinate another apple tree. However, if you buy two of these 'Kordia' trees, they will not offer each other any of the additional benefits of cross pollination.

The pollination groups are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6, according to flowering time. Best results will be obtained if one variety is planted near another apple tree of the same group. In the UK, because of our longer spring, you can also choose a partner from a group on either side (so an ideal pollination partner for group 3 would be one in group 2, 3 or 4).

Fruit Benefits

These fruits taste best when freshly picked from their branches. They please even the most sophisticated of palates, and can be made into jams and preserves to bring great summer memories on autumn or winter days. Fruit plants are a valuable addition to any garden, bearing in mind that they do not only provide fruits, but also make a bold statement in garden arrangements by producing clouds of pink and white flowers, which at the slightest breeze fall like raindrops. When planning your garden, try to choose varieties with fruits that ripen from early summer to late autumn to ensure a constant supply of fresh fruits throughout the warmer months.

Fruit Tree Rootstocks

Fruit trees are generally budded or grafted onto a rootstock by the nursery, this means the roots of the tree are a different plant to the trunk, branches and fruit. Effectively sticking two plants together, one that has good roots and one that has good fruit, ensures that you get what you pay for. Plants raised from seed will vary from the parent plants and there will be a wide variation in the size or shape of a tree and the quality and quantity of fruit it produces. Another result of budding and grafting a variety onto selected rootstocks is the ability to control the size of the tree to a certain degree. However, the size that a fruit tree ultimately grows to is dependent on a number of factors:

  • The fruit variety ( i.e. Apple Braeburn)
  • How itís pruned
  • Soil type
  • Position
  • Its rootstock
Some varieties of tree are naturally more vigorous than others, so this will affect how much they grow each year. For instance a Bramley Apple seedling will naturally grow bigger than a Coxís Orange Pippin Apple seedling. The correct pruning will also help to control the size of tree, as well as encouraging it to produce flower buds from which fruit develop.

Where you grow your fruit tree and the soil it is growing in also impacts on its ability to grow and thus eventual size. Most fruit trees need a good amount of sunshine to grow well and for the fruit to ripen with high sugar content. Trees growing in cold, open spots will grow slower than those that are protected and warm. The same is true for the soil, with trees growing in light sandy soils generally growing more slowly and not reaching such a large size as those in rich fertile soils which will be more vigorous and taller growing.

Optional Extras
  • Fruit Tree Grease Band - 1.75m
    Add +
  • Fruit Tree Greasebands - 1.75m
    Add +
Selected items will be included with your purchase

This is an example of our polypot - note the fruit/ornamental trees we stock will vary in appearance according to species and season.
 
Customer Reviews

Average Rating: 4.3/5 (10 reviews)

Rating: 4/5

"not as good a tree as I would of liked."

Reviewed Sunday, 4 September 2016

Rating: 4/5

"As Above"

Reviewed Monday, 7 December 2015

Rating: 5/5

"Trees were very healthy and excellent quality"

Reviewed Thursday, 2 April 2015

Rating: 5/5

"Excellent plant condition"

Reviewed Monday, 29 December 2014

Rating: 5/5

"first class condition, very healthy looking tree"

Reviewed Friday, 5 December 2014

Rating: 5/5

"Very pleased with the cherry tree ,it arrived really quickly & in perfect condition , I would recommend it to any one ,& would use again. Thank you."

Reviewed Monday, 1 September 2014

Rating: 2/5

"I did not think the tree was in good condition, it had gummosis at the top of the hardwood and was pruned in a way that would require a lot of further training"

Reviewed Wednesday, 30 July 2014

Primrose says: "Thank you for your feedback. We're sorry to hear your tree arrived with disease, but are glad to see customer service arranged a refund for you."
Rating: 4/5

"The parcel revealed a beautiful, healthy cherry tree, which, I know, will produce lovely cherries. Feel very happy!"

Reviewed Monday, 12 May 2014

Rating: 4/5

"Beautiful and so far alive, :-) but a little smaller than expected"

Reviewed Tuesday, 18 March 2014

Rating: 5/5

"I trust your service Definitely c u again"

Reviewed Saturday, 5 October 2013

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