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Prunus 'Flavorcot' | Apricot Tree

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prunus_armeniaca_flavorcot
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The fruits are very large and juicy with a red blush and succulent, sweet orange flesh. Superb aromatic flavour. Specially bred for the cooler UK climate, to produce huge crops of large egg sized, delicious orange-red fruits with outstanding colour, texture and flavour. Being late flowering, Apricot 'Flavourcot'® is also frost resistant so you will always get a crop. We use a St.Julien A rootstock which limits the growth of the tree which not only makes it perfect for smaller gardens but has been proven to encourage better crops from the tree. The fruit not only tastes great in jams or preserves and cooking, but also tastes brilliant straight from the tree.


Q:Does Height Really Matter?

A: Not As Much As You Might Think...

One stand out specification that customers often use to judge the value of a tree is the height. So should height directly correlate with the price of a tree? No, not necessarily.
To an extent the height of a tree can give you a good indication of its maturity but you must not forget: To grow a productive, well shaped, healthy tree you must prune it back regularly, especially when young.
Our trees often grow up to 2m in the fields before we prune them back and package them ready to send out. This pruning encourages the tree to grow more, stronger branches and ensures there is a good balance between the root size and top growth. This ensures that your tree puts energy into establishing a healthy root base instead of supporting top growth, providing a better foundation for your tree in the future.
So, in summary: Don’t let the extra 10/20cm you may find elsewhere sway you. You are likely to be paying extra for the delivery costs and, if you want a healthy tree in the long run, you’re going to have to chop it off anyway!

  • Arrives as: Bare root tree
  • Approx. Height on Arrival: 130-150cm
  • Approx. Age on Arrival: Tree is approx. 1 year old with a 2 year old rootstock
  • Approx. Growth Height: 3.5-4m
  • Rootstock: St Julien A Semi-dwarfing
  • Rate of Growth: Fast
  • Harvesting Period: August
  • Flower Colour:  White/pink
  • Foliage Colour: Green
  • Flowering Period: April
  • Tolerance: Prefers sun
  • Uses: Dessert
  • Hardiness: Fully hardy
  • Exposure: Sheltered
  • Self-fertilising: Yes
  • Scented: Barely
  • Wildlife friendly - attracts bees and other pollinating insects
Fruit trees are often budded or grafted onto a rootstock by their nursery, which means their roots are of a different plant to that of their branches and fruit. As a consequence, you will have a variety with the best qualities of two plants (such as good roots and fruiting). An important result of a rootstock is the ability to control the size of the plant. However, this can still be impacted by a number of factors:

  • The fruit variety
  • Pruning
  • Soil type
  • Planting position
Some varieties are naturally more vigorous than others, so this will affect how much they grow each year. For example, a Bramley Apple seedling will naturally grow bigger than a Cox’s Orange Pippin Apple seedling. The correct pruning will also help to control the size of your plant, as well as encouraging it to produce flower buds from which fruit develop.

Your plant’s soil and planting location will also affect its resulting size. Most need a good amount of sunshine to grow well (and also for their fruit to ripen with a high sugar content). Trees growing in cold, open spots will grow slower than those that are protected and warm. The same is true for soil, with those growing in light sandy soils often growing more slowly, while those planted in rich, fertile soils being more vigorous.
  • Pollination: pollination group 5, self-fertilising

Self-fertilising tree may be planted with our other varieties in pollination close pollination groups to ensure the best pollination. Instances of poor pollination are nearly always caused by bad weather at blooming time, limiting the activity of insects.

Each fruiting tree has ideal pollination partners. These are divided into groups and are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6, according to flowering time. Best results will be obtained if variety is planted near another tree of the same group, or from a group on either side (so an ideal pollination partner for group 3 would be one in group 2, 3 or 4). The major cause of poor pollination is bad weather in blossom time, limiting the activity of insects.

Packaging

We have developed an eco friendly polypot that is currently in use across our 9 litre range. This polypot has less than 20% of the plastic used by a regular pot, and is importantly recyclable. Polypots also prevent root spiraling, encouraging a healthier root system.

All trees arrive in an extra thick cardboard box with a clamp to hold their pot in place. This prevents them from moving around on their journey.

Nursery staff will wrap the roots of our bare root trees and use compost to keep them moist during transportation. This extra protection prevents them from drying out, allowing for a flying start. We also use the same specialised box that our potted trees have to keep them nice and secure as they make their way to your home.
How your order will arrive

Water young trees regularly until roots are well established. Trim annually from mid to late summer. Apply some fertilizer in spring in order to promote healthy growth and a good crop. Optionally, mulch in spring. Check tree ties regularly and loosen any if necessary to avoid rubbing of the stems.

  • Light Requirements: Full sun
  • Soil Requirements: Almost all normal garden soil with pH 6.5 - 7.5
  • Moisture: Moist/ well-drained
  • Planting Distance: 5m

Suited to almost all well-drained and moderately fertile soils with pH between 6.5 and 7.5 in a sheltered, full sun location.
Before planting your tree, clean up all wandering weeds and keep a clean ring around the tree base. Dig a hole approximately a third wider than the root ball. Carefully yet firmly backfill the remaining soil around the root ball and water well during the first year until well established.

Autumn is the best season for planting fruiting trees, as the soil moisture and heat allow easier and faster root establishment and regeneration of damaged root systems.

More Information
Is Collection/Mix? No
Needs Ericaceous Compost? No
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